Author Archives: That Unique* Weblog

About That Unique* Weblog

Adjusting to car culture, dealing with leaving a career I loved, and spouting off along the way. Do The Most Good.

Review: Troublemaker by John Cho

Aimed at middle grade readers, John Cho’s TROUBLEMAKER takes place on the first day of the protests following the acquittal of the police officers who beat Rodney King. The main character, Jordan Park, is a first-generation Korean-American. In one of … Continue reading

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Review: FELLOWSHIP POINT by Alice Elliott Dark

Just in time to help summer reading feel substantial, Alice Elliott Dark’s FELLOWSHIP POINT arrives on July 5, 2022 with its 600 pages to satisfy your literature cravings. The novel follows two lifelong friends, Agnes and Polly, through heartbreak, love, … Continue reading

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Review: Huda F Are You? by Huda Fahmy

HUDA F ARE YOU is a graphic memoir (albeit fictionalized) by Huda Fahmy that tackles identity, teen angst, family expectations, and friendship with earnest humor and empathetic introspection. With deeply moving scenes around self-doubt, fitting in, and the love between … Continue reading

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Review: ALMOST AMERICAN GIRL by Robin Ha

In ALMOST AMERICAN GIRL, writer and illustrator Robin Ha shares a deeply personal journey of moving from Korea to the United States as she grapples with identity, harassment, and her relationship with her mother. The memoir starts off with a … Continue reading

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Review: WHAT HAPPENED, MISS SIMONE?

WHAT HAPPENED, MISS SIMONE? (2015) is a love letter to all Nina Simone accomplished and all she wanted to be and all she had to leave to the side. It also lifts the veil of idolatry that so many mythic … Continue reading

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Review: WHEN THEY SEE US (2019)

The limited Netflix series about the Central Park Five, WHEN THEY SEE US, is harrowing to watch, and infuriating to contemplate. To be honest, I felt sick to my stomach and had to stop watching several times; I even considered … Continue reading

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Review: FINE by Rhea Ewing

As a comic about gender, Rhea Ewing’s FINE is pretty close to perfect. It is organized by topic, and the content is a collection of nuggets found in more than 50 interviews Ewing conducted over a decade. With painful and … Continue reading

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Review: Josephine Against the Sea by Shakirah Bourne

JOSEPHINE AGAINST THE SEA is a fast-paced middle-grade novel by Shakirah Bourne that blends the usual angst and challenges of middle grade stories (loss of a parent, best friend drama, questionable adults, feeling different) with mythology and magical threats to … Continue reading

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Review: The Stories Behind the Stories by Danielle Higley

THE STORIES BEHIND THE STORIES by Danielle Higley delves into how some of our favorite classics came to be. Whether they were sparked by an author’s childhood or by a publisher’s desire to give teachers more science stories, each example … Continue reading

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Review: Your Life Matters by Chris Singleton

Chris Singleton’s beautiful picture book YOUR LIFE MATTERS is a masterful expression of reassurance and love. It begins with a frightening and direct set of circumstances that might make young children, especially young Black children, feel like the world does … Continue reading

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